Village of
Ada,
Ohio

Ada Water Department

The EPA's Consumer Confidence Rule requires public water suppliers that serve the same people year round (community water systems) to provide consumer confidence reports (CCR) to their customers. These reports are also known as annual water quality reports or drinking water quality reports.  The URL for this report was provided on the water bill that is due on June 10, 2013.  You can also view it by clicking here (requires a pdf reader).  Information about the CCR rules can be found at the EPA Site.  The text of our report is provided below as well.

 

===============================================================

 

 

The Ada Water Department has prepared the following report to provide information to you, the consumer, on the quality of our drinking water.  Included within this report is general health information, water quality test results, how to participate in decisions concerning your drinking water and water system contacts.

 

Sources of Ada Drinking Water

The Ada Water Department receives its drinking water from three wells at the water treatment plant. The well

water is pumped from the aquifer under Ada by the wells, aerated, softened, stabilized, filtered, chlorinated, fluoridated and pumped to the distribution system for your use.

 

The aquifer that supplies drinking water to the Village of Ada’s wellfield has a high susceptibility to contamination. This determination was made because of the following reasons:

   The depth to water in the carbonate aquifer is generally between 20 and 40 feet below the ground surface;

   Many (probably in excess of 100) unused wells exist within the protection area, which breach the confining layer and provide a direct pathway from the ground surface to the aquifer; and

   numerous other potential significant contaminant sources exist within the protection area.

 

This does not mean that the aquifer will become contaminated, only that under the existing conditions ground water could become impacted by potential contaminant sources. A review of the Village of Ada’s water quality record currently available in Ohio EPA’s drinking water compliance database did not reveal any evidence of chemical contamination at levels of concern in the aquifer.

 

Please note that this water quality evaluation has some limitations:

1)Thedta luatd is frtrted tersamples on,sOhio EPAs monitoingquirmentsre for the teringroviddto the publi, not thewterbfrettmnt.

2)Smplingsults foroliom bateand ntulluringinnicmpounds otherthan rsnic) wenot evlted orthis assssmnt, buse thyrenotalible indictor ofquir ontamination.

The Village of Ada has identified 33 potential contaminant sources that lie within the determined protection area, not including the abandoned wells. Some of the types of potential contaminant sources present are underground storage tanks, present and former dry cleaners, automotive service stations, a football factory, a former junkyard, former quarries, roads, and a railway.

 

Protective Strategies

Protective strategies are activities that help protect a drinking water source from becoming contaminated or

further contaminated. Implementing these activities can provide a number of long-term benefits, including: protecting the health of the consumers;

preserving water resources for future generations;

avoiding the expense of cleaning up a contaminated water supply or finding alternative sources of water; and

  preserving or enhancing the economic value of the area by securing an abundant supply of clean water.

 

The Village of Ada has outlined its proposed protective strategies in the April 1996 document “Wellhead Protection Education and Management Plan,” prepared by S.A. Smith Consulting Services. These strategies were endorsed by Ohio EPA in 1996.

 

The Wellhead Protection Education and Management Plan is available to the public by calling the Ada Water Department at 419-634-4045.

 

 

What are sources of contamination to drinking water?

The sources of drinking water both tap water and bottled water include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs,

springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally- occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

 

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

  1. Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife;
  2. Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming;
  3. Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses;
  4. Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by- products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban Storm water runoff, and septic systems; and
  5. radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

 

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.

 

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

 

General Health Information: who needs to take special precautions?

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population.  Immuno-

compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infection. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791) or at www.epa.gov/safewater/hotline.

 

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The Village of Ada is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

 

 

About your drinking water: water quality test results

The EPA requires regular sampling to ensure drinking water safety. We conducted sampling for bacteria,

fluoride, nitrates, SOCs (synthetic organic chemicals), VOCs (volatile organic chemicals), TTHMS and HAA5 during 2012. Those bacteria, fluoride, nitrate, SOC, VOC, TTHM (total trihalomethane) and HAA5 (haloacitic acids) samples were below the limits set by the EPA.  The Ohio EPA requires us to monitor for some contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently.  Some of our data, though accurate, are more than one year old. This report shows regulated and unregulated contaminants that were detected during 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012.

REGULATED CONTAMINANTS

Contaminants

MCLG

MCL

Level

Found

Range of

Detections

Violation

Sample

Year

Typical Source of

Contaminants

Radioactive Contaminants

No radiological contaminants have been detected in the past 5 years

Inorganic Contaminants

 

Nitrate

 

10ppm

 

10ppm

 

.25 ppm

 

 

NO

 

2012

Runoff from fertilizer use;

leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion from natural deposits.

 

Fluoride

 

4.0 ppm

 

4.0 ppm

 

.91 ppm

 

.91-.91

ppm

 

NO

 

2012

Erosion of natural deposits;

Water additive which promotes strong teeth.

Copper

1.3 ppm

AL=1.3

ppm

0

NA

NO

2010

Corrosion of household

plumbing

 

Zero out of 20 samples was found to have copper levels in excess of the copper action level of 1.3

ppm.

Lead

0 ppb

AL=

15ppb

0

NA

NO

2010

Corrosion of household

plumbing

 

Zero out of 20 samples were found to have lead levels in excess of the lead action level of 15 ppb

Synthetic Organic Contaminants Including Pesticides and Herbicides

No synthetic organic contaminants were detected in the past 5 years

Volatile Organic Contaminants

TTHMs

Total Trihalomethane

NA

80 ppb

16 ppb

16-16 ppb

NO

2012

By product of drinking

water chlorination.

HAA5

Haloacitic Acids

NA

60 ppb

2.8 ppb

2.8-2.8

ppb

NO

2012

By product of drinking

water chlorination

Residual Disinfectants

Total Chlorine

MRDL=

4.0 ppm

MRDL = 4.0

ppm

1.0

ppm

.9 -1.0

ppm

NO

2012

Water additive to control

microbes.

                 

Comments on regulated contaminants

Regulated contaminants are contaminants that have monitoring and MCL requirements set by the Ohio EPA.

 

Drinking water containing fluoride is considered beneficial by The Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

 

UNREGULATED CONTAMINANTS

 

Contaminants

MCLG

MCL

Level

Found

Range of

Detections

Violation

Sample

Year

Typical Source of

Contaminants

Volatile Organic Contaminants

Bromodichloromethane

Not Regulated

3.9

ppb

NA

NO

2012

By product of drinking

water chlorination

Dibromochloromethane

Not Regulated

1.5

ppb

NA

NO

2012

By product of drinking

water chlorination.

Chloroform

Not Regulated

10.6

ppb

NA

NO

2012

By product of drinking

water chlorination.

 

Comments on Unregulated contaminants

Unregulated contaminants are contaminants that the Ohio EPA requires testing but there are no current MCL

standards. Bromodichloromethane, Dibromochloromethane and Chloroform are by-products of using chlorine for disinfection of drinking water.

 

Definitions of some terms contained within this report.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there

is no known or expected risk to health.  MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

 

Maximum Contaminant level (MCL): The highest level of contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

 

Parts per Million (ppm) or Milligrams per Liter (mg/L) are units of measure for concentration of a contaminant. One part per million corresponds to one ounce in 7,350 gallons of water.

 

Parts per Billion (ppb) or Micrograms per Liter (μg/L) are units of measure for concentration of a contaminant. One part per billion corresponds to one ounce in 7,350,000 gallons of water.

 

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG): The level of drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

 

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL): The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

 

Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

 

Action Level Goal (ALG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. ALGs allow for a margin of safety.

 

 

Additional Information

The Ada Water Department has a current, unconditioned license to operate our water system from the Ohio

EPA.

In March of 2013, the Ada Water Department was awarded a Water Fluoridation Quality Award from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for maintaining a consistent level of optimally fluoridated water for 2012. Community water fluoridation has been recognized by CDC as one of the 10 great public health achievements of the 20th century.

 

How do I participate in decisions concerning my drinking water?

Public participation and comment are encouraged at regular meetings of Ada Village Council, which meets at the Ada Municipal Building on the first and third Tuesday of each month at 6:30 p.m.

 

Water system contacts

For more information on your drinking water contact Phil Epley at 419-634-4045.

 

 

 

 

 

WASTEWATER REPORT

 

2012 CONSUMER FINANCIAL REPORTS

(all balances are as of Dec. 31, 2012)

 

This is the 2012 annual financial report about your wastewater treatment system. The monthly bill you received

in 2012 has two line items for wastewater: regular sewer (coded as “SW” on your bill) and operation and maintenance (coded as “O&M” on your bill.)  Your regular sewer payment is divided into sewer debt at 80% and operation at 20%.  In 1978, regular sewer debt was incurred with Phase 1 construction cost of $1,258,945. This loan has been paid in full.

 

Operation and Maintenance was added to the bill in 1996 to pay for additional operation and maintenance costs of the Phase 2 improvements at the treatment plant. Of this payment, 80% is maintenance and 20% is for operation.  Phase 2 construction cost was $1,122,854 with current outstanding debt of $297,072.

 

Phase 3 improvements were started in the winter of 2000 at an estimated cost of $2,348,000. $1,749,952 of this cost is a 2.2% interest loan.  Current debt of this loan is $882,558 and will be paid for by the operation and maintenance portion of your bill.  The current 5/8” meter equivalent operation and maintenance monthly charge is $8.00 for inside rates and $16.00 for outside rates.

 

These improvements are mandated by the Ohio EPA to keep our facility in compliance with state law. More information can be obtained by calling the Water and Sewer Office at 419-634-4045.

 

WATER REPORT

This is the 2012 annual financial report about your water treatment system.  The monthly bill you received in

2012 has one line item for water (coded as “WT” on your bill.) Your water payment is divided into water debt at 20% and operation at 80%. In 1993, Ada constructed a three-phase improvement project with completion in 1996.

These improvements brought our plant into Ohio EPA compliance.  In 2005, the water department expended

$200,000 to paint the water tower.  This will be paid over the next 10 years.  Current debt on that project is

$104,100. In 2006, two new lime slakers were installed at a cost of $132,000 to be paid over the next ten years. Current debt on that project is $62,200.

 

More information can be obtained by calling the Water and Sewer Office at 419-634-4045.

Village of Ada Water Department
2012 Drinking Water Quality Report
1
The Ada Water Department has prepared the following report to provide information to you, the consumer, on the quality of our drinking water. Included within this report is general health information, water quality test results, how to participate in decisions concerning your drinking water and water system contacts.
Sources of Ada Drinking Water
The Ada Water Department receives its drinking water from three wells at the water treatment plant. The well water is pumped from the aquifer under Ada by the wells, aerated, softened, stabilized, filtered, chlorinated, fluoridated and pumped to the distribution system for your use.
The aquifer that supplies drinking water to the Village of Ada’s wellfield has a high susceptibility to contamination. This determination was made because of the following reasons: The depth to water in the carbonate aquifer is generally between 20 and 40 feet below the ground surface; Many (probably in excess of 100) unused wells exist within the protection area, which breach the confining layer and provide a direct pathway from the ground surface to the aquifer; and numerous other potential significant contaminant sources exist within the protection area.
This does not mean that the aquifer will become contaminated, only that under the existing conditions ground water could become impacted by potential contaminant sources. A review of the Village of Ada’s water quality record currently available in Ohio EPA’s drinking water compliance database did not reveal any evidence of chemical contamination at levels of concern in the aquifer.
Please note that this water quality evaluation has some limitations:
1) The data evaluated is for treated water samples only, as Ohio EPA’s monitoring requirements are for the water being provided to the public, not the water before treatment.
2) Sampling results for coliform bacteria and naturally-occurring inorganic compounds (other than arsenic) were not evaluated for this assessment, because they are not a reliable indicator of aquifer contamination.
The Village of Ada has identified 33 potential contaminant sources that lie within the determined protection area, not including the abandoned wells. Some of the types of potential contaminant sources present are underground storage tanks, present and former dry cleaners, automotive service stations, a football factory, a former junkyard, former quarries, roads, and a railway.
Protective Strategies
Protective strategies are activities that help protect a drinking water source from becoming contaminated or further contaminated. Implementing these activities can provide a number of long-term benefits, including: protecting the health of the consumers; preserving water resources for future generations; avoiding the expense of cleaning up a contaminated water supply or finding alternative sources of water; and preserving or enhancing the economic value of the area by securing an abundant supply of clean water.
The Village of Ada has outlined its proposed protective strategies in the April 1996 document “Wellhead Protection Education and Management Plan,” prepared by S.A. Smith Consulting Services. These strategies were endorsed by Ohio EPA in 1996.
The Wellhead Protection Education and Management Plan is available to the public by calling the Ada Water Department at 419-634-4045.
Village of Ada Water Department
2012 Drinking Water Quality Report
2
What are sources of contamination to drinking water?
The sources of drinking water both tap water and bottled water include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.
Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
a) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife;
b) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming;
c) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses;
d) Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban Storm water runoff, and septic systems; and
e) radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.
In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.
Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).
General Health Information: who needs to take special precautions?
Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infection. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791) or at www.epa.gov/safewater/hotline.
If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The Village of Ada is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.
Village of Ada Water Department
2012 Drinking Water Quality Report
3
About your drinking water: water quality test results
The EPA requires regular sampling to ensure drinking water safety. We conducted sampling for bacteria, fluoride, nitrates, SOCs (synthetic organic chemicals), VOCs (volatile organic chemicals), TTHMS and HAA5 during 2012. Those bacteria, fluoride, nitrate, SOC, VOC, TTHM (total trihalomethane) and HAA5 (haloacitic acids) samples were below the limits set by the EPA. The Ohio EPA requires us to monitor for some contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently. Some of our data, though accurate, are more than one year old. This report shows regulated and unregulated contaminants that were detected during 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012.
REGULATED CONTAMINANTS
Contaminants
MCLG
MCL
Level Found
Range of Detections
Violation
Sample Year
Typical Source of Contaminants
Radioactive Contaminants
No radiological contaminants have been detected in the past 5 years
Inorganic Contaminants
Nitrate
10ppm
10ppm
.25 ppm
NO
2012
Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion from natural deposits.
Fluoride
4.0 ppm
4.0 ppm
.91 ppm
.91-.91 ppm
NO
2012
Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth.
Copper
1.3 ppm
AL=1.3 ppm
0
NA
NO
2010
Corrosion of household plumbing
Zero out of 20 samples was found to have copper levels in excess of the copper action level of 1.3 ppm.
Lead
0 ppb
AL= 15ppb
0
NA
NO
2010
Corrosion of household plumbing
Zero out of 20 samples were found to have lead levels in excess of the lead action level of 15 ppb
Synthetic Organic Contaminants Including Pesticides and Herbicides
No synthetic organic contaminants were detected in the past 5 years
Volatile Organic Contaminants
TTHMs
Total Trihalomethane
NA
80 ppb
16 ppb
16-16 ppb
NO
2012
By product of drinking water chlorination.
HAA5
Haloacitic Acids
NA
60 ppb
2.8 ppb
2.8-2.8 ppb
NO
2012
By product of drinking water chlorination
Residual Disinfectants
Total Chlorine
MRDL= 4.0 ppm
MRDL = 4.0 ppm
1.0 ppm
.9 -1.0 ppm
NO
2012
Water additive to control microbes.
Comments on regulated contaminants Regulated contaminants are contaminants that have monitoring and MCL requirements set by the Ohio EPA.
Drinking water containing fluoride is considered beneficial by The Center for Disease Control and Prevention.
Village of Ada Water Department
2012 Drinking Water Quality Report
4
UNREGULATED CONTAMINANTS
Contaminants
MCLG
MCL
Level Found
Range of Detections
Violation
SampleYear
Typical Source of Contaminants
Volatile Organic Contaminants
Bromodichloromethane
Not Regulated
3.9 ppb
NA
NO
2012
By product of drinking water chlorination
Dibromochloromethane
Not Regulated
1.5 ppb
NA
NO
2012
By product of drinking water chlorination.
Chloroform
Not Regulated
10.6 ppb
NA
NO
2012
By product of drinking water chlorination.
Comments on Unregulated contaminants
Unregulated contaminants are contaminants that the Ohio EPA requires testing but there are no current MCL standards. Bromodichloromethane, Dibromochloromethane and Chloroform are by-products of using chlorine for disinfection of drinking water.
Definitions of some terms contained within this report.
Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.
Maximum Contaminant level (MCL): The highest level of contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.
Parts per Million (ppm) or Milligrams per Liter (mg/L) are units of measure for concentration of a contaminant. One part per million corresponds to one ounce in 7,350 gallons of water.
Parts per Billion (ppb) or Micrograms per Liter (μg/L) are units of measure for concentration of a contaminant. One part per billion corresponds to one ounce in 7,350,000 gallons of water.
Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG): The level of drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL): The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.
Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.
Action Level Goal (ALG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. ALGs allow for a margin of safety.
Village of Ada Water Department
2012 Drinking Water Quality Report
5
Additional Information
The Ada Water Department has a current, unconditioned license to operate our water system from the Ohio EPA.
In March of 2013, the Ada Water Department was awarded a Water Fluoridation Quality Award from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for maintaining a consistent level of optimally fluoridated water for 2012. Community water fluoridation has been recognized by CDC as one of the 10 great public health achievements of the 20th century.
How do I participate in decisions concerning my drinking water?
Public participation and comment are encouraged at regular meetings of Ada Village Council, which meets at the Ada Municipal Building on the first and third Tuesday of each month at 6:30 p.m.
Water system contacts
For more information on your drinking water contact Phil Epley at 419-634-4045.
2012 CONSUMER FINANCIAL REPORTS
(all balances are as of Dec. 31, 2012)
WASTEWATER REPORT
This is the 2012 annual financial report about your wastewater treatment system. The monthly bill you received in 2012 has two line items for wastewater: regular sewer (coded as “SW” on your bill) and operation and maintenance (coded as “O&M” on your bill.) Your regular sewer payment is divided into sewer debt at 80% and operation at 20%. In 1978, regular sewer debt was incurred with Phase 1 construction cost of $1,258,945. This loan has been paid in full.
Operation and Maintenance was added to the bill in 1996 to pay for additional operation and maintenance costs of the Phase 2 improvements at the treatment plant. Of this payment, 80% is maintenance and 20% is for operation. Phase 2 construction cost was $1,122,854 with current outstanding debt of $297,072.
Phase 3 improvements were started in the winter of 2000 at an estimated cost of $2,348,000. $1,749,952 of this cost is a 2.2% interest loan. Current debt of this loan is $882,558 and will be paid for by the operation and maintenance portion of your bill. The current 5/8” meter equivalent operation and maintenance monthly charge is $8.00 for inside rates and $16.00 for outside rates.
These improvements are mandated by the Ohio EPA to keep our facility in compliance with state law. More information can be obtained by calling the Water and Sewer Office at 419-634-4045.
WATER REPORT
This is the 2012 annual financial report about your water treatment system. The monthly bill you received in 2012 has one line item for water (coded as “WT” on your bill.) Your water payment is divided into water debt at 20% and operation at 80%. In 1993, Ada constructed a three-phase improvement project with completion in 1996.
These improvements brought our plant into Ohio EPA compliance. In 2005, the water department expended $200,000 to paint the water tower. This will be paid over the next 10 years. Current debt on that project is $104,100. In 2006, two new lime slakers were installed at a cost of $132,000 to be paid over the next ten years. Current debt on that project is $62,200.
More information can be obtained by calling the Water and Sewer Office at 419-634-4045.